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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 658 (some duplicates have been removed)
environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
grows, if you follow the metaphor that bullying is a systemic virus, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to
out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to take a view of the city will not forget. it has a beautiful
-on in an environment where the market is at five-year highs, where fundamentals are great and not okay and where the federal reserve is absolutely not guaranteeing federal reserve action going for the next six or 12 months, you need to be very careful. you've got a drip open. look for dripping in, look for corrections and pullbacks, do it over time because this is classic investors mistake. five-year high, people open the paper and it's time to invest and they dump the money at the worst possible time. >> you think that we're due for a bit of the break after all the money having made into equities the last couple of months. i'm not looking for a 20% correction but it's inevitable when the market his 1306 on the dow, we'll have to see how earnings play out over the course of the next 30 days but there will be an opportunity to buy some songs at a cheaper price. >> the vent dealing will be the real driver of the market going down, right? >> we know mobile has been driving everything throughout technology. what do you want to hear out of the conference call and how they will capitalize? >> we want
. so one of the things that many of us here understand that the environment or what we call the climate influences outcomes but often times in public schools where decisions are made, climate and educational mandates are perceived as two opposite ends of the continuum, like when i have time and i've achieved my test scores and we've got everything buttoned up, then we'll get to the klie mallet. we've heard it from speaker after speaker, that conditions set the stage for children to leeb lean in and achieve. the good news is we can move bullying out of the front page not with more dollars but with more changes in our attitudes and our interactions. if more teachers perceive themselves to be call friendly and know the names of boys and girls in their buildings, part of it is reeducation that climate and environment and changing social norms is not secondary, it's primary and when we all embrace that then we'll begin to see the changes in the policies and the practices and we'll begin to get the results we want. we need to advocate for improving the social climates of our public school
over the long haul there's going to be that balance between a permissive environment in terms of air operations which is what we've been operating in afghanistan and iraq and permissive air environments in other regions of the world where we can fly the capabilities whether it's predators and reapers or u2s, whatever the case maybe be. you need those capabilities that can operate in more high treat environments. >> what kind of capabilities, when you mentioned more high threat in the pacific, the criticism is you need far greater rage and you're going to need greater amount offense stuff what is the specific responsibilities that the air force needs to be able to operate over the pacific the way we've been operating over iraq, afghanistan yemen and other places. >> we talk about moving to the all source capability. we focused on the airborne layer of intention over the last decade as we operate in iraq and afghanistan. when you look in the computer where do you gather all this data, the space capability, the airborne capability, human intelligence capabilities, cyber capability, all
industry. i was just wondering if you would talk a little bit about the environment and environmental issues. here in this country whenever we talk about new exploration, we're also talking about environmental implications, and we hear about disasters here. we don't really hear much about them in russian -- russia, though i'm sure they exist and can be quite massive. so i wondered if you'd just talk about that a bit. >> well, here we come to the guilty part of the guilty love. because i'm as conscious as everyone else that we are, in a sense, too clever for our own good. by the way, one of the unfortunate consequences of this bonanza that we are, that we have just, that we are now harvesting is that we are headed in all likelihood for an era of quite possibly cheaper hydrocarbons, and certainly very abundant hydrocarbons. that thing which is so easy for us which is to climb this our car and head to the nearest gas station is something that's going to get easier and easier and easier for the next generation. and this is very bad news for the environment, there's no question about that.
classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultural background and we don't couple that with behaviors that kids will display. and the other thing in terms of context that i want to make sure is clear and i didn't am happy you're here and we are fighting a battle against pop culture and the messages they receive on tv, logging on to the facebook page, logging on to all of the social media that is out there, think how many times in pop culture they refer to someone as "their little b, or little n" and that's just the way we greet each other and for someone that entered school only speaking spanish and you think about the language issues and in spanish i can tell you a whole bunch of terms that people use to great each other that are so racist, homo phobic and have a length and accepted as accepted and we need to work together and we're dealing with a culture we are trying to shift and in san francisco we are proud of the work around the issue of toler
but i'm hearing it may be a redevelopment of the area with a different built environment. is that what -- >> director rahaim: yeah. i believe as a state agency, they're not allowed to -- state university, they can't sell outright because that would be lease but the idea is it would be redeveloped and ucsf would move out. >> commissioner antonini: but there could be a difficult built environment but you're not sure what they have in mind. >> director rahaim: the assumption there would be a whole new different buildings there, new development, yes angetd thank you. >> president fong: commissioner sugaya. >> commissioner sugaya: just on sue hestor's point about an org chart ther is one but it doesn't have staff so you can put people on here. >> director rahaim: we have a work chart that shows the staff names and we've happy to put that on the website. >> commissioner sugaya: that would help because i've wondered where people are and stuff like that. then in terms of -- thank you for answering my question right off the bat that's clear. so i think the numbers will change as you come back.
is good or bad about the current environment, we need to look not just at what we have lost or gamed compared to broadcast news but what we lost or gamed compared to the era of realism in the 19th century or the partisan press, in the late 18th century. or the progress receive era. so, we have really gone through these changes before, and the issue in front of us is not, is it good or bad? what's good about it, and what's bad, and how to maintain what is good and limit what is bad. >> host: let's go to the historical set of your book. what have we lost in this new era as opposed to the abc, nbc, cbs era. which is an era. >> guest: i think we lost significant things -- i should say lost -- you made the point that we have been talking about this for 20 years, we are style transitioning so those stations, those news networks still exist. but when we lived in an era, which we did in the '50s and ' 0s, and all the way up to the '90s where we as a society, wees a citizens, believed that if we watched the local news and then the national news, an hour or so period in the early evening, that
down. we have to take care of our environment. we need a rich canopy of trees in the city" and this what is means to so many people, and he was one of strong voice bs our environment. he has been known for that and in the years of 2000 he took up the college trustee on the board. many of you know in the past years he was passionate about his work at city college. he knew, and again we had the opportunity to share what we got out of college and what so many generations of youth would want and desire in our city college. he was leading the effort in my opinion to restore and to elevate the level of integrity and transparency at our city college. he demanded that of the other trustees as well as the administration . he went through some hard times as a trustee and shared with members here of the difficult years when things weren't as transparent as they should have been and integrity wasn't at the top of someone's mindful priorities but this is something he stood for. this is something him and his family stood for. as i know carolyn and her work on the status of woman an
young guides in this natural environment, it's really given me a fresh energy. >> reporter: for these young tour guides showing visitors around the island they call home is also a great opportunity to grow up. >>> every year at this time scientists race to the antarctic. they use the small window of summer to study the frozen continent. more and more they're documenting changes they believe are linked to global warming. australian researchers have a strong presence at the south pole. they're essentially in their back yard. nhk world's takeo nakajima shows us what they're working on. >> reporter: it's summer in antarctica, and it's a busy time for animals, from penguins to scientists. experts at australia's four observation bases are hard at work, documenting climate change. th are ao seeing its effects firsthand. planes use ice runways to bring in researchers and goods. but those runways haven't been as reliable in recent years. when temperatures rise above minus 5 degrees celsius the surface begins to melt. that makes landing and taking off risky. 80% of flights planned in
of planning, san francisco environment, department of public works, capital planning committee, redevelopment successor agency. what we did is we meet monthly and bring all our existing work together, recommending -- or looking to implement much of the work that requires participation  departments.[a so -- such as green building ordinance, stormwater design guidelines and non-potable ordinance, recommendations that were created in the electricity users plan. and also help to inform our future work such as the urban watershed system. but we know that we can't always just lead with the environment. we have to lead with the economy as well. and currently sustainability in our implementation programs is really falls under requirements or]xjp[tÑ incentives. what we'd like to do is evaluate some financing mechanisms that bring that back into implementing sustainable development projects that strengthen the city's economic base, and as well as create good partnerships on the private sector side. and recognizing that growth in and of itself -- urban growth is good for the environment. we know that.
. maybe you don't already know, but the group, the neighborhood and environment network has given them an award for the best come back neighborhood of 2012 and i thought that might be of interest to you, so again we ask you for your support on this development. thank you. >> thank you. shane sew, allen lie, theresa dickcue. >> good afternoon. i'm living in the san bruno avenue and strict parking there already congested and all day long and if you build the building, the full story, it will cost to double park and a lot of accidents, the car accidents. that's why -- i live across the street i'm not safe at all. that's why we have to omit one floor, one story of that building because it's full story. if that area they don't have full story houses. and also the parking. i am living just across the street and i experience of the parking because all of the parking i will see everyday, and the business for us is already reduced a lot as i believe if they build the full building and a lot of people and dwelling and offices and commercial it would cost a lot of cost. parking makes the p
the environment, the through quality equipment, maintenance and training we operate our vessels and facility in his way that best protects the environment and employee and is rereduce the hazard doubts ways through recognized best management practices, blue and gold peer frean marine terminal and pier 49 were the first facilities certified clean and green by the city and county department of the environment. pier 41 is located in the heart of fisherman's whaf and is determine in about for the blue and gold vessels and ferries from tub bureau ron and sauce leet toe and angel likelihood dock at pier 41 and americanners can arrive from one distinguish nation and seemlessly transfer to a ferry for another and at peer 41 vessels can dock simultaneously and ensures that vessels depend and arrive on time shively and efficiently and this is important as a lot of passengers rely on the vessels for work. and there is an under ground 10,000-gallon fuel contagious critical in an emergency as we are able to store fuel there for ten days of continuous prayings in 2012, peer 41 is expected to generate $8.
of access to the humanities that urban environments provide, we have a better shot at than, say, other places where large distances have to be traversed in most american cities to kind of get to the places you want to get. here in san francisco, we have been blessed by the geometry where our trips are short where 40 years ago we realized that this was the way we will have to kind of meet our future. the iron call part of that is at the same time europe also discovered that and they made strides to towards actually implementing these alternative choices, we have found it very difficult to kind of wean ourselves from the convenience of being able to. i say it is still convenient to drive. as long as the alternatives are not just as convenient, we won't be able to make our case about our travel modes as contribution to the detriment of the environment or to the detriment of our health as we all know the sun is by date getting madder at us and angle grier at us and we are getting fat. we got to do something about it. this is the time to do it. we have the best opportunity here with these f
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have poverty, a quarter of our children have no health care. what was a million students a year and a half ago is now a million and a half. when you have good nutrition and good health, you will learn better. it goes hand in hand with good mental health and a good school environment. the research points out, we want our k
's a healthy environment and bullying prevents that for so many kids. when terreesa and i addressed issues around truancies and one of the common themes and i saw this before with sexually exploited cases and kids were afraid to go to school because of the terrorism going on and with bullying it's flat out terrorism for the victim and the recipient of it. our efforts are strong because we don't want kids to feel that the only choice is don't go to school or find a new school to go to and also gave us the opportunity to look at the children that are bullied and what is going on in their house or family and why are they acting out to an aggressive, mean way? and it opened up a lot of doors for us and our initiative is take this head on to make sure children feel safe and they are safe and our challenge is the introduction of the internet and social media and can be so insidious behind closed doors. the governor signed a bill into law and my office and the l.a. county sheriff have committed to keeping track and data of crimes that occur involving the internet or social media because we fran
the environment for those who may liv5p$i(om here, but also for te who are here for a lot of other purposes too. as general as we can make it. and then under bullet points, which is our mission, i don't see anything mentioned -- i talk about fostering exemplary design, that's something new. but i see nothing mentioned about preserving our historic resources which is very important, and should be a bullet point because we have one of the new cities at least in america that has a great cultural heritage and we have to make sure it isn't destroyed as much as it was in the 60's and in the past and we preserve the architecture we have of value. and finally the other part that is mentioned here we talk a little bit about we're a great place to work, these are values. but there has to be more emphasis on it being -- making it the most appealing place in the united states or probably in the world for people to work, and to locate their businesses. and, finally, for i think we need a bullet point that says something to the effect, encouraging spaces for appropriate cultural recreational, educational, ho
the cats that are in this pretty complex environment and trying to get them moving in a common direction. >> general baldwin? >> first, i'm very, very encouraged at the direction the department of defense has taken in changing the way that we do support the civil authorities. and the evolution, the problem that came out of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no visibility on what forces are available at camp pen
environment to another, what environment was the environment she was going to that caused the permit change? do you think that it was a culture thing from that environment? if so, can you elaborate more on the culture that she had -- that had changed her personality and what you think needs to be done? >> guest: yeah, you know, well, what happened was that when my father came here to the united states, my mother was left with us back in mexico, and she had to suffer, you know, the way a lot of wives suffer when they see their husbands go to another country, and there was a fear of being forgotten, abandoned, him finding another woman while he's gone. this was a fear that my mother had every single day about my father finding himself another woman here in the u.s., and forgetting about us and about her so she had to deal with this every single day, and when my father sent for her, it was such an amazing moment for her to feel wanted, to feel that her husband actually needed her by his side, and this is why she came because shemented to make sure that she could protect her marriage, that she
to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. >> this week on "to the contrary" first, women and minorities are missing in obama's inner circle. then, women are binge drinking more. behind the headlines: the country's newest female governor: new hampshire's maggie hassan. >> hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, cabinet concerns. president obama is catching flak for his first few cabinet nominations for his second term -- that for leaving out women and persons of color, especially after women voters secured his victory in last fall's election. although president obama wanted to nominate susan rice as secretary of state to replace hillary clinton, so far he's appointed men to head up the departments of state, treasury, and defense. and the high-profile position of cia director also went to a male. long
down a little bit more during the course of 2013. but given the overall environment that we're in, the fact that securities are repricing at lower levels as we reinvest, the overall low rate of environment is not unusual. we do have offsets in our loan portfolio as our national strategic non-portfolio runs down or winds off. we have an opportunity to invest in higher yield customer oriented relationships, and so we think we've got some stabilizing forces. it's hard to tell exactly how the market reacted in one given day to our net interest margin. but we feel like we've had pretty good management of it and i'm optimistic we'll maintain some stability in a tough environment in 2013. >> your fee income did come in lower than expected, though, both capital markets and mortgage banking. is that just a one-time only? are we going to see a better series of numbers in 2013? >> well, yeah, capital markets is probably the big driver of any up or down movement in our fee income. the fourth quarter was an unusual quarter in a couple of ways. one, you had the impact of hurricane sandy where t
of our schools. they're not military encampments. they're safe environments in which the children feel very secure around with that kind of protection. you think about, in your country, england has an armed presence for international flights going in and out of england in a very sensitive environment called an airplane. post-9/11, people said guns have no place in the cockpit or in the passenger planes. but in fact, they have worked very well because they're trained. >> actually, let me pick you up on that. what's been effective on planes is an outright ban on any weapons, any guns. that's what's been effective. the reason you dont see people using guns on planes is they have been banned. this brings me to the point of what i have been trying to get to on this show, which is it's not about removing everybody's guns in america. it's a complete fallacy when people spin out that line. it's designed, i think, to instill the kind of fear president obama talked about today. trying to make people think, oh, my god, they're coming for my gun. and what happens is a lot of americans buy more of
. for the environment. there's no question about that. fortunately in russia they don't have an environment. at least they have frequently behaviored as though they didn't have an environment. and certainly the oil industry has never meant particular -- been particularly concerned about the environment. i remember in the 1990s talking to the minister of the environmental science. he happened to be briefly also the ministry of agreology. i met him in the huge office. there were maps that showed radio active tam contamination. he was interesting. and id asked him about the environment. he said we don't have one. we can't afford one. it was very much the story of the 1990s. the signature of the russian hydrocarbon industry is very brief. it's absolutely conventional up to this point. and their investment in renewable and unconventionals is at this point. [inaudible] with one big exception in the nuclear power. they consider that to be a virtuous renewable. as for solar, well, the agency in charge of solar-power development is coordinated to the nuclear power agency which is tells you something. and so o
attention to the environment. people are very environment conscious and i see community aggregations also to have renewable energy. it makes me very happy because in italy we have been following this path for a very long time. for example in the first six months of this year we installed photovoltaic panels larger than the united states all put together. it shows you the extent of the revolution happening. i am sure italian companies will be happy to work with the local institutions that have started to generate projects that will somehow go in that direction, and also we want to have parties and communication activities to show the people in the street that it is important to have sustainable behaviors and not to leave a carbon footprint behind us. >> [inaudible] >> yeah, if i understand correctly because -- you said about the innovation -- if we? >> [inaudible] >> yeah, okay. well, we're going to have in the museum of computer science in mountain view an exhibition show casing what italians have done to create silicon valley. i mentioned one person but there are many other example
. learn about it. it will save our environment by using a viable renewable resource it will create jobs for millions of californians. it will be reforest our trees, seal, expunge, destroy any felony, misemeanor, present or prior. it will allow those 21 and over responsible adults to use cannabis responsibly like they do in other nations. it will tax the recreation industry like tomatoes and the money will go to the social infrastructure. we will go nationwide with this. plan ongoing worldwide with this. we will end the war on cannabis. using a medicine that comes from god, genesis 2:9, crack open your bibles. san francisco is a city of love. congratulations. it is the interest of my life work since 1976. god bless you all. >> next speaker. >> president chiu, supervisors, elected officials and public. i stand to be in a great deal of excitement because within our african-american tradition we are celebrating the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. i congratulate those who have been elected on this most auspicious occasion. i want to say that i think it is very good
a safer peaceful environment. i wish to you that we have a happy holiday but let's work every sunday and then sunday to send and quest to demilitarize our society and jobs and drugs and guns out and let's choose another way. thank you very much. [applause] >> if we could have your attention for a few minutes. reverend jackson is catching a flight and why he's rushing out so if we could hold your attention for a few moment we would appreciate it. >> mike pappas from the interfaith council is coming to spend a couple moments on the clergy work and then we will close. >> i am in the unenviable position of following a national icon but good people i would indulge you for just a moment to hear a humble message. the theme of today's gathering peace is a prospect that we all pray for -- ah, that was -- but to get there will require the collective participation efforts, resources, and resolve of all in our city by engaging faith leaders to join in the broader effort to end violence in san francisco. mayor lee recognizes a precious resource that could be the effective key to realize our su
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 658 (some duplicates have been removed)

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